Apple vs Dell experience

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Apple vs Dell experience

  • This is for anyone considering a switch to Apple from a Dell/Windows machine. First off I own both, an inspiron laptop, a Dell desktop at work, and a homebuilt windows XP box at home and a Powermac Dual G5 2.0 I purchased the mac 3 months ago. I am pretty tech savy and know my way around windows quite well. I do web design and development for a living as well as teach Web Design and Flash at a local college. I depend on my computer for my paycheck. I purchased the Power Mac primarily for Photoshop and Music applications like Cubase. I had never intended to do coding, office, etc on the Mac. As it's turned out the Mac has been such a pleasant experience that I now only touch the PC if I need to test out an asp or asp.net page. Not only is the Mac more stable, it is a much more pleasant environment to work in. I have had zero problems networking my Mac with my home network, nor communicating with the primarily Windows network at work. Customer support from Apple has been second to none. I initially ordered a refurb powermac which arrived DOA, the way Apple dealt with this was superb. I couldn't have been more pleased. My wait time on hold wasn't that long and I wasn't transferred from dept to dept like I have been with Dell (I also own an AXIM X50V). I've had alot of experience with Dell customer service and it has never been good over the past 5 years I've dealt with Dell. So if your concerened with compatability with the Mac, don't worry you'll be fine. Like I said, I kept an xp box around just in case but have found it rarely used and I mean rarely. I am so much more productive on the Mac as well, far less time fiddling with settings etc.

    No I don't work for Apple, I am just passing along my experience as a service to anyone who has been considering the switch. I'm what some would consider a power user and the difference between the Dell and the Mac are night and day. The difference between driving a Ford thats in the shop constantly and customer service that really doesn't care and a Toyota that gives you zero problems and customer service that seems to realize that part of their paycheck comes from you. I say this with utmost sincerity, you don't have to put up with shody products and bad customer service.
  • aside from the fact that I'm much more familiar and productive with windows, macs are also generally more expensive.  other than that, I don't know a lot of negatives about them (gaming aside -- which I also like).   they're prettier though :)

    Latitude D430
    Dimension 9150
    Dell 1815dn Printer

  • We've partially switched. My wife 100% with an iMac G5, and I enjoy the Mac experience on a iBook (notebook). However I find it a mixed experience:

    On the good side, OS X is a joy to use, everything works well together, and the hardware is both beautiful and high quality. Apple has the best repair record and greatest customer satisfaction in the industry. You can get knowledgable support in their retail stores. For most uses (games being the exception) the software available for the Mac is more than adequate and seems to work better than PC software. However...

    The G4 processor used in the Apple notebooks is inferior to any recent Intel notebook processor. My 3 year old Inspiron 8200 easily outperforms my brand new iBook, and even the outrageously expensive PowerBooks aren't that much faster. (OTOH, I really hate to use the Inspiron and love to use the iBook -- go figure!) Once Apple switches to Intel, the iBook will be very appealing indeed!

    Apple has a bad return policy that discourages switchers (no trial period and 10% restocking fee). The warranty terms aren't as good (no at-home service, nothing like Complete Care for notebooks) and virtually all parts are proprietary which discourages repair by tech-savy owners. At least it has standard USB and you can replace that rediculous one button mouse with a real Logitech or Microsoft one. Don't even ask about the new Apple "Mighty Mouse" which is probably the worst two button mouse ever designed.

    I've found mixed-system networking problematic with fixes requiring research on my part. Macs also require regular software maintenance. While one might not need to run virus software and deal with spyware, there is nothing that precludes such things happening in the future -- there have been many security patches so there are certainly security holes.

    I can't get rid of my Inspiron because it runs some Electrical Engineering tools that aren't available for the Mac. I also need parallel and serial ports not available on Macs.

    Finally there is the cost. No doubt in my mind or wallet, Macs cost more.
  • In a one-on-one comparison, Imac is a higher quality product for a much higher price. It is like comparing a Mercedez-Bens to a Chevrolet or Ford. Mercedes is great if you have that kind of money to spend; if you don't, you purchase what you can afford, or do without.
  • It's been a long time since I've posted. I work for a new company now. Still use a mac. Many employees have moved over to Mac, mainly after experiencing iphones and ipads. They really couldn't be happier and our IT dept hasn't had any problems integrating them into a windows network.

    My wife after suffering through 3 Dell laptops moved over to a Macbook Pro last year. She's happy. One of the few times I've heard "I wish I would have listened to you in the first place.

    As far as money, I don't see Apple has being more expensive over the life of the computer. Having great support and being trouble free is worth a lot. They keys started falling off my wifes Inspiron a year after she bought it. I could go on, but I've been on both sides here. Not a fanatic, just use what works the best.