/_layouts/PublicBlueTheme/images/enterprise_portalv2.gif

Following a tragic event where an unexpected storm in 2008 that lead to the death of a submarine crew, the U.S. Navy expanded a program to help the submarine fleet better predict weather. Today this program is considered one of the most advanced weather prediction centers in the world, and is called the Fleet Numerical Meteorology & Oceanography Center.  

There is a lot of buzz around a recent story from CNET's Daniel Terdiman because of the used of high performance computing in this effort, with the largest of the site's supercomputing resources being a Dell cluster system called the A2 Emerald, with a peak performance of 27.3 peak teraFLOPS. 

It's also exciting to note that regardless of the location of the U.S. Naval Fleet, including our subs, the Fleet Numerical Meteorology & Oceanography Center is operating behind the scenes. All of this work is designed to not only keep our crews safe, but also serves as a key strategic military advantage.

You can read the full story here: How Navy supercomputers help sailors beat an ancient nemesis

Christine Fronczak