Windows 7 Ultimate - storing up problems for the future?

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Windows 7 Ultimate - storing up problems for the future?

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Hi

I would like to do a clean instal on my XP machine as I have had nothing but problems since I bought it with Vista Home Premium pre installed . 

The cheapest option is to upgrade.  I have run the Upgrade Advisor and been advised that I can upgrade to Windows 7 Home Premium or Ultimate.  My husband is a mature student so I can get an education licence on Ultimate at £57.99.  There is no education licence of Windows & Home Premium available so the cheapest is £98.  That said, Ultimate is way over the top for my needs. 

Am I storing up problems for the future by installing Ultimate, as in when another version of Windows or whatever MS calls it comes out, am I always going to have to instal (and pay for) the premium version?

I have considered biting the bullet now and buying the full version as I'm not sure of the complexity of performing a clean install with upgrades discs.  Any thoughts anyone?

Lulu

 

 

 

 

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  • Hello, can anyone help me with this please?!

  • Lulu01

    Hi

    I would like to do a clean instal on my XP machine as I have had nothing but problems since I bought it with Vista Home Premium pre installed . 

    The cheapest option is to upgrade.  I have run the Upgrade Advisor and been advised that I can upgrade to Windows 7 Home Premium or Ultimate.  My husband is a mature student so I can get an education licence on Ultimate at £57.99.  There is no education licence of Windows & Home Premium available so the cheapest is £98.  That said, Ultimate is way over the top for my needs. 

    Am I storing up problems for the future by installing Ultimate, as in when another version of Windows or whatever MS calls it comes out, am I always going to have to instal (and pay for) the premium version?

    I have considered biting the bullet now and buying the full version as I'm not sure of the complexity of performing a clean install with upgrades discs.  Any thoughts anyone?

    Lulu

     

    First if you bought a PC with Vista installed it's not an "XP Machine".    Whether you can successfully upgrade to Win 7 depends on your PC model number, which you failed to include.  Some Dell's that support Vista do not 100% support Windows 7 thus there could be an in issue getting all the required hardware device drivers.

     

    Which version to install depends on your requirements.  For most users either  the Home Premium or the Professional editions are more than adequate.  The "ultimate" was intended for commercial business users but in a marketing ploy Microsoft named it "ultimate" and thus many users "must have" the ultimate edition.

    As far as which edition, you can "upgrade" a Vista 32 bit to a Windows 7 32 bit without problems.  Or you can upgrade a Vista 64 bit version to Windows 7 64 bit, however you cannot upgrade a Vista 32 bit version to Windows 7 64 bit version - that takes a new install (reformat the hard drive and install everything).

    There is no need to wait for the next Windows OS version as your "old" PC will probably not be compatible or at best marginally compatible.  With the next OS, if you need that, it will be time for a new PC.

     

     

     

     

    I am not a Dell Employee

    Dell forum member since 2002

    Home Built PC with Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD5H motherboard, i7 3770 CPU,  Windows 7 64 bit Home/Win 8.1.  SSD drive.  Sonar X3c 64 bit Recordng Software.

     

    Member of Nashville based R.O.P.E.

  • There are four premium Windows 7 versions:  Home Premium, Professional, Enterprise, and Ultimate - in that order.  Each version adds features to the previous, the Pro and Enterprise editions adding features useful for business, and Ultimate has it all.  As Pro and Enterprise are targeted towards business (Games are disabled by default, file encryption, etc.), the upgrade from Home Premium for home users, is Ultimate, which has all the features that Pro and Enterprise do, in a package for home users.  A couple of reasons why someone might get Ultimate over Home Premium:

    Ultimate can run XP Mode - Windows XP from within Windows 7 (a compatibility feature) which includes the license to run XP; Home Premium can run XP virtually (similarly), but only if you already own a valid copy and license of XP.

    Ultimate can join a domain, Home Premium cannot.

    Ultimate supports Remote Desktop, Home Premium does not.

    As for needing to always upgrade to the Premium version, yes, likely that will be the case.  With Windows Vista upgrades to Windows 7, the upgrade path was like-to-like (or higher).

    From Windows Vista (SP1, SP2) Upgrade to Windows 7

    Business

    Professional, Enterprise, Ultimate

    Enterprise

    Enterprise

    Home Basic

    Home Basic, Home Premium, Ultimate

    Home Premium

    Home Premium, Ultimate

    Ultimate

    Ultimate

    So, if you get the Ultimate now, you might always be locked into Ultimate, unless you purchase a full version of something and reinstall - or they change their upgrade paths, which is unlikely.  However, as Firebird said, when Windows 8 or 9 comes out, you might not be able to run it on your current computer anyway.