Recovery drive (d) full

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Recovery drive (d) full

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I have been searching the fourm for answers to this question and still not sure on the answer.

My recovery drive (d) is full. Will not let me backup anymore.

the files in the folder is as follows:

Media ID.bin

tools

windows

program files

users

Dee-PC

dell

sources

programdata

Is there anything I can delete from this to recover more space?

Should I even worry about it?

I have XPS 420

OptiPlex 755

4GB memory

Vista

 

Verified Answer
  • Backups should NEVER be done on the same physical hard drive.  If that drive fails everything is lost including your backups.  Backup to a separate drive, then if there is a hardware failure of the drive you haven't lost your backed up data. 

    I have a USB connected hard drive that I do full backups to using Acronis True Image software.  I do complete backups of my hard drive (how often depends on what I have done or installed, etc) including all partitions (the main "C" drive plus the Dell Recovery and Diagnostic partitions).  If there is a hard drive failure, or just a corruption of the Operating System, for example, you can fully recover with the Acronis backup to the hard drive in about a hour.

    I am not a Dell Employee

    Dell forum member since 2002

    Home Built PC with Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD5H motherboard, i7 3770 CPU,  Windows 7 64 bit Home/Win 8.1.  SSD drive.  Sonar X3c 64 bit Recordng Software.

     

    Member of Nashville based R.O.P.E.

All Replies
  • Backups should NEVER be done on the same physical hard drive.  If that drive fails everything is lost including your backups.  Backup to a separate drive, then if there is a hardware failure of the drive you haven't lost your backed up data. 

    I have a USB connected hard drive that I do full backups to using Acronis True Image software.  I do complete backups of my hard drive (how often depends on what I have done or installed, etc) including all partitions (the main "C" drive plus the Dell Recovery and Diagnostic partitions).  If there is a hard drive failure, or just a corruption of the Operating System, for example, you can fully recover with the Acronis backup to the hard drive in about a hour.

    I am not a Dell Employee

    Dell forum member since 2002

    Home Built PC with Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD5H motherboard, i7 3770 CPU,  Windows 7 64 bit Home/Win 8.1.  SSD drive.  Sonar X3c 64 bit Recordng Software.

     

    Member of Nashville based R.O.P.E.

  • As advised, you should not store backups on the same drive... at least not without also having them copied to/duplicated on an external source - i.e. an external hard drive, CD/DVD, or a pendrive (/flash drive).

     

    But you shouldn't be using the 'Recovery' partition for backups anyway Surprise

    That partition contains the files required/used by the Dell restore process, and adding your own files to it, could corrupt the restore process - such that you won't be able to restore your system to its factory settings!

    From experience, I've found that:   “Beauty is in the eye of the beer-holder”!!

     

    XPS M1730:

    Smoke Grey Magnesium Alloy Chassis - with White LED Backlights
    17" UltraSharp WUXGA Widescreen TFT (1920 x 1200) with TrueLife
    Intel Core 2 Duo Processor T9300 @ 2.50GHz (800 MHz FSB, 4MB L2 cache)
    4GB (2x 2GB) Patriot Signature PC2-5400 @ 667MHz
    DUAL 512MB Nvidia 8800M GTX cards in SLi + 128MB Ageia PhysX
    640GB SATA II (2x 320GB WD Scorpio Black 7200rpm)
    8x Super-Multi DVD±RW
    Creative X-Fi Notebook (ExpressCard) + Creative GigaWorks T40 Series II
    Integrated 2MP Webcam
    Dell Wireless 355 Bluetooth 2.0 Module
    Intel Next-Gen Wireless-N Mini-Card
    TV Tuner and Dell Travel Remote Control
    4-in-1 Flash Card Reader (SSD/MMC/MS Pro/xD)

    230W AC Adapter / 9-cell Lithium-Ion Battery

    Windows 7 Home Premium (64bit)

  • When you say backups..I never changed anything for these files. I just let it do its thing. Was something changed and I never realized it?

    I also have the reinstallation DVD that came with my computer along with drivers DVD.

    You are saying I should purchase an external drive for backups..which is fine..you can get one for under $100. in most places. I was just wondering why these files where in there and why when I searched the forums for answers I never seen the list that I have..meaning the extra files I seem to have in there..MediaID.bin..Dee-Pc and Programdata..

    Should I take out anything that I have in there and direct it to my C drive? and ofcorse how do I do that?

    I appreciate your time on this matter.

    Thank you all..

    Dee

  • Hi

    Remove this {Media ID.bin} and this {Dee-PC}and you will be safe to go !!

    And use a USB drive to backup to !

    Good Luck

     

    Jerry\c3po5

    XPS 430 Ram 8 gigs Dell OEM Vista Ultimate 64 bit  

    Retail Windows 7 Ultimate 64 Bit Full version 

    Dimension 8400 Ram 4 gigs Retail  Vista Ultimate 64 bit

    Retail Windows 7 Ultimate 64 Bit Full version 

    Dimension E 512 Ram 4 gigs Dell OEM Vista Ultimate 64 bit

    Inspiron 1501 Ram 4 gigs Dell OEM Vista Ultimate 64 bit

    Retail Windows 7 Ultimate 64 Bit Full version on drive 2

  • Ok so its safe to move these two files to a USB drive?

    Seems like the Dee-Pc is System Restore points? How did they end up in there? Should I move them to copy to C drive after I copy them to USB drive?

    Gosh, I feel so confused and this is not the only Dell system I have had..just new to this D recovery backup.

    Thank you,

    Dee

     

  • Hi Life_Sparkles, The only files you need in there are,

    Dell,

    Program Files,

    Sources,

    Tools,

    Users,

    Windows.

    As for your other files, either move them into your C drive, then burn them to disc, or send straight onto an usb drive pen.

          

    If my answer Was helpful?  Please let me know by clicking on the 'Did this answer your question' and clicking on the Yes button.  Thanks.


     

     

  • Is there a certain place in C drive I should be directing dee-PC and MediaID-bin and Programdata to? I know I will be copying them to a usb drive pen.

    I am sorry about all these questions but I really want to make sure I do this right.

    Thank you so much for the answers for this question.

    Dee

  • Hi Life_Sparkles, You can copy them to anyway in your C drive, Ie Program files, or even to your Desktop. Then copy them your USB.But, what you can do in the future is to create an folder, and save it to there, until you are ready to transfer the contents to your USB.

          

    If my answer Was helpful?  Please let me know by clicking on the 'Did this answer your question' and clicking on the Yes button.  Thanks.


     

     

  • RobinBredin..

    Thank you so much! Seems easy enough. I appreciate your time on this.

    Dee

  • And I thought that I wasn't too bad with computers having bought my 3rd Dell in 9 years.  First 2 were desktops, newest one is Inspiron 1525 with a full (red) 'Recovery D drive'.  I do not understand what this drive does, nor why it is full, but my laptop is working very very slowly.  Even the McAfee scan is doing about 4 files avery 15 minutes!  It is virtually unusable and I do not understand why.  I am currently using my desktop.  The frustrating thing is that I can find no information as to why I now have this extra drive, or how to use it.  The stuff that you have explained is all beyond me, I am afraid. 

    It therefore seems that Vista is not for the majority of home users who are not computer whizz kids!  My hardly used new laptop of only a few months, now seems too full to use even though it has a 160gb hard drive with little on it! 

    Dell Dimension 5150;  Intel(R) Pentium(R) 4 CPU 3.00GHz, Processor speed 2.92 GHz;  Windows XP Home Edition;  1024MB RAM; 160GB hard drive;  HL-DT-ST DVD+-RW GWA4164B;  HL-DT-ST DVD-ROM GDR8164B.  Microsoft Security Essentials.

    Dell Inspiron 1525; Intel(R) Celeron(R) CPU 550@ 2.00GHz; Windows Vista Home Premium; 2GB RAM; .160GB hard drive. AVG Free Antirus.

     

     

     

     

  • Larna

    And I thought that I wasn't too bad with computers having bought my 3rd Dell in 9 years.  First 2 were desktops, newest one is Inspiron 1525 with a full (red) 'Recovery D drive'.  I do not understand what this drive does, nor why it is full, but my laptop is working very very slowly.  Even the McAfee scan is doing about 4 files avery 15 minutes!  It is virtually unusable and I do not understand why.  I am currently using my desktop.  The frustrating thing is that I can find no information as to why I now have this extra drive, or how to use it.  The stuff that you have explained is all beyond me, I am afraid. 

    It therefore seems that Vista is not for the majority of home users who are not computer whizz kids!  My hardly used new laptop of only a few months, now seems too full to use even though it has a 160gb hard drive with little on it! 

    My laptop is still flashing up the message that my D drive is full all the time.  It is driving me mad.  I never use this drive and I still don't understand why I have it.  It was never on my previous Dell PCs.  What is the point of it, and how can I shut it up?

    Dell Dimension 5150;  Intel(R) Pentium(R) 4 CPU 3.00GHz, Processor speed 2.92 GHz;  Windows XP Home Edition;  1024MB RAM; 160GB hard drive;  HL-DT-ST DVD+-RW GWA4164B;  HL-DT-ST DVD-ROM GDR8164B.  Microsoft Security Essentials.

    Dell Inspiron 1525; Intel(R) Celeron(R) CPU 550@ 2.00GHz; Windows Vista Home Premium; 2GB RAM; .160GB hard drive. AVG Free Antirus.

     

     

     

     

  • Larna,

    The  'Recovery D drive' was put there by Dell to be used instead of a Installation DVD so you can re-install your operating system as it came from the factory. It is basically your re-installation DVD put on this D drive. This will re-install Vista only. No other applications, programs or files that you have added to your computer can be re-installed from the D drive. Do not try to re-install or restore from the D drive until it is cleaned up or fixed.

    The  'Recovery D drive' is not suppose to have anything else added to it, ever. If anything else was put in there it is likely that it will not work properly, if you can get the files out that have been added since you received the computer, it might work again.

    The 'Recovery D drive' is usually 10GB with from 5GB to 8GB of used space. That leaves 5GB to 2GB of free space available, this will get used up fast if something is added, which nothing should be. It seems that this 'Recovery D drive' gets used inadvertently for something like backup files, unknowingly or by accident. When the D drive gets full the computer will give you a warning that it is full and won't be able to write to it anymore. Your Anti-virus doesn't know it's full, the Anti-Virus needs free space on the D drive when it runs a scan on it, and so it's trying to run the scan with a very small free space which slows it down - a lot. Just cancel the virus scan on the D drive until you get it sorted out.

    Never add anything to the D drive, make sure your backups are not going to the D drive, they should go to a different physical disk like an external hard drive.

    You will continue to get the’ D drive is full’ warning until you can remove some of the excess files from it. 

    Vista is a very good operating system and will handle many of the required actions on your computer automatically, it will also give you warnings if you are about to do something that might cause you trouble. I find Vista to be very capable and stable as well as non-whizz friendly, but nothing is perfect.

    You should try to get Dell support (you have a fairly new computer) to help you with this, their software support is for 3(I think?) months, I'm not sure of the exact length of the software warranty. If possible they might be able to remotely access your computer and remove the added files. If that scenario doesn’t work, then list all of the folders in the 'Recovery D drive' and someone on this forum can try to help you remove them from the D drive. 

    Good luck,

    _______________________________

    Inspiron 530s, Intel Core2 E7200, 6 GB DDR2 800MHz, 500GB SATA II 7200RPM, 22" Widescreen LCD w/2 MP Webcam,Radeon HD4650, Windows 7 Ultimate 64bit,  eSATA port 

    Studio Laptop 1737, Intel Core2 Duo T6400 800MHz , 4GB DDR2 memory 800MHz, Intel X25-V 40GB SSD, 320GB SATA II,17" WXGA w/2.0-megl webcam, Facial recognition, Windows 7 Ultimate 64bit, Vista Premium 64-bit,  eSATA port,  9-cell battery 
    External HDD: A.C.Ryan w/500GB Seagate Barracuda SATA II 7200RPM w/eSATA, WD My Book 500GB 7200RPM w/USB
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  • Larna-

    I think I saw in an earlier post you use McAfee.  I use Norton 360, and it has a backup feature itself.  I had to go into the user setting and change where I want my backups to be sent.  I JUST FIGURED THAT OUT TODAY!!!!!  Set your back ups to go to a DVD or an external hard drive if possible.  I don't know how McAfee works, but if you look  on the bottom right hand part of your tool bar, there should be an icon for McAfee...like a big red M or something.  Click on it and see if it has an automatic backup feature, and then see where it's going.  More than likely, it's sending it to your D: drive, thus taking up all the space.  Just a suggestion.  Hope it helps!