Receiving incoming calls on my laptop.

Software & Operating Systems

Software & Operating Systems
Microsoft, Linux, Productivity software, discussion

Receiving incoming calls on my laptop.

  • I have an Inspiron E1705. There is an icon called netwaiting on the system tray. I thought that we could receive incoming telephone calls on the laptop with a headset with the help of that software. I called Dell technicians who could not give me a satisfactory answer to my question. Now, I have wireless Internet connection and hence do not need the dial up connection.
    I want to know if I can use the "Netwaiting" software to receive and make telephone calls  from the laptop with a headset without having to connect to the dial up internet. If that is not possible , is there any other way to make/receive telephone calls from the laptop ?
     
    Sincerely,
    Edwin Sterling.


  • pjay161 wrote:
    I have an Inspiron E1705. There is an icon called netwaiting on the system tray. I thought that we could receive incoming telephone calls on the laptop with a headset with the help of that software. Sincerely,
    Edwin Sterling.


    NetWaiting provides a dialup user the ability to suspend their Internet connection on the modem line while recieving an incoming voice call provided they have Call Waiting from the telco *and* their ISP supports MoH (modem on hold). At the end of the voice call, the Internet connection is restored.

    It's usless for Broadband users.

    As far as making calls over the Internet I am not aware of any services left (there were a bunch during the dotcom boom) which allow you to call POTS (plain old telephone service) lines for free. There are many that allow you to make PC to PC calls for free (ex: Skype http://www.skype.com/ ) but charge a fee to call landlines.

    Personally if I want to make a phone call I just pick up the phone but hey, maybe that's just me. :smileyhappy:



  • datapod wrote:


    pjay161 wrote:
    I have an Inspiron E1705. There is an icon called netwaiting on the system tray. I thought that we could receive incoming telephone calls on the laptop with a headset with the help of that software. Sincerely,
    Edwin Sterling.


    NetWaiting provides a dialup user the ability to suspend their Internet connection on the modem line while recieving an incoming voice call provided they have Call Waiting from the telco *and* their ISP supports MoH (modem on hold). At the end of the voice call, the Internet connection is restored.

    It's usless for Broadband users.

    As far as making calls over the Internet I am not aware of any services left (there were a bunch during the dotcom boom) which allow you to call POTS (plain old telephone service) lines for free. There are many that allow you to make PC to PC calls for free (ex: Skype http://www.skype.com/ ) but charge a fee to call landlines.

    Personally if I want to make a phone call I just pick up the phone but hey, maybe that's just me. :smileyhappy:





    Plenty of services exist, although most (if not all) require an additional fee for outgoing calls to PSTN.

    Vonage + softphone upgrade to account - $20/mo, think softphone upgrade is $5. Typical Vonage, they charge extra for a feature (BYOD) that most other providers give a discount for. Vonage provides a complete landline replacement service with unlimited incoming/outgoing domestic calling.

    Other Vonage-like landline replacement services have somewhat different plans, don't lock their hardware adapters to their service, and are more friendly towards "softphones". IMO Vonage are scum, but they are the most well known example of such a service provider. There are better alternatives though.

    There are also some services that provide you with a free unlimited incoming PSTN number, but charge you per-minute for outgoing calls. StanaPhone (www.stanaphone.com) is one good example, but you can only choose an area code in the NYC area.

    A few other providers provide DIDs (incoming numbers) for very small fees (I think SIPPhone/Project Gizmo does DIDs for $35/year), outgoing calls are charged per-minute.

    There are a huge number of VoIP services out there now, ripe to choose. Currently I have a few free DIDs from Stanaphone and FreeDigits, plus I also have outgoing to toll-free only via IAXtel (note: IAXtel is a service I would not consider unless you are VERY familiar with VoIP telephony, it's designed for people to test Asterisk VoIP PBX systems.)

    Once you've made the initial VoIP leap, there are lots of other neat options available, such as dedicated VoIP phones such as the Linksys/Sipura SPA-941 and analog terminal adapters such as the Sipura SPA-1001 that allow you to connect a standard analog telephone to VoIP services. For power users with hardware for a dedicated server, there's Asterisk, or Trixbox (www.trixbox.org), which is a complete Linux distribution that includes Asterisk and some very nice web-based administration capabilities for *.