This might sound absurd, but it’s all true. 

I used my American Express Blue Card points to exchange for a $200 Dell eCertificate and used it to purchase a new Garmin Nuvi 265T priced at $189.00, after a $60 discount and free shipping.

I read all the terms and conditions, and just to make sure I called Dell sales to verify that my eCertificate was valid for the Garmin GPS and that I would not need to pay any amount as long as I submited the coupon online; the sale rep ensured me of that.  When I did make the purchase I made sure that the final charge to the cart was $0 before I hit submit.

I started to use the GPS as soon as I received it, it was only a few days later when I discovered that Dell has charged me $270.93 on my American Express for the purchase in addition to redeeming my $200.00 eCertficate; the bottom line is that I paid $470.93 for a GPS I could have purchased for $189.00 plus tax on Dell.com.

You must have asked by now, what the heck happened?  So I called Dell support, and after several phone transfers, the “Customer Care” rep responded that I should have used American Express Card to make the purchase; the funny thing is I did use an American Express Card for the purchase.

The next thing the “Customer Care” rep accused me of foolish enough to buy something of lesser value, not redeem the full amount of $200, thus making the eCertificate invalid.  Even though the eCertificate clearly implies that I could do so with the following term: 

    “ No cash value. Non-redeemable for cash equivalent. Unused balance will not be refunded. "

After a few minutes, he decided that because the item already have $60 discount and free shipping therefore I forfeited my eCertificate and the $60 discount when I made that purchase.  The rep actually said, by applying the eCertificate, some how I had even forfeited the $60 discount that I would have had if I just make the regular purchase; that is some fine indemnity clause.

I read the terms and conditions on the certificate several times, and nowhere does it say that I cannot use it to purchase promotional items on Dell.com, and nowhere during the purchase was I warned that the certificate is invalid.

I’m an IT person, and I had pushed my institution to purchase Dell servers and workstations. After three hours of getting nowhere, I lost faith that Dell can provide the service I have expected.  I plan to solve my problem by contacting American Express instead, and file a complaint with Better Business Bureau; I already called Dell to return the GPS.  Facts are on my side, I’m certain I’ll prevail.  I hope the readers will learn something from my frustrating experience.

This might sound absurd, but it’s all true. 

I used my American Express Blue Card points to exchange for a $200 Dell eCertificate and used it to purchase a new Garmin Nuvi 265T priced at $189.00, after a $60 discount and free shipping.

I read all the terms and conditions, and just to make sure I called Dell sales to verify that my eCertificate was valid for the Garmin GPS and that I would not need to pay any amount as long as I submited the coupon online; the sale rep ensured me of that.  When I did make the purchase I made sure that the final charge to the cart was $0 before I hit submit.

I started to use the GPS as soon as I received it, it was only a few days later when I discovered that Dell has charged me $270.93 on my American Express for the purchase in addition to redeeming my $200.00 eCertficate; the bottom line is that I paid $470.93 for a GPS I could have purchased for $189.00 plus tax on Dell.com.

You must have asked by now, what the heck happened?  So I called Dell support, and after several phone transfers, the “Customer Care” rep responded that I should have used American Express Card to make the purchase; the funny thing is I did use an American Express Card for the purchase.

The next thing the “Customer Care” rep accused me of foolish enough to buy something of lesser value, not redeem the full amount of $200, thus making the eCertificate invalid.  Even though the eCertificate clearly implies that I could do so with the following term:

    “ No cash value. Non-redeemable for cash equivalent. Unused balance will not be refunded. "

After a few minutes, he decided that because the item already have $60 discount and free shipping therefore I forfeited my eCertificate and the $60 discount when I made that purchase.  The rep actually said, by applying the eCertificate, some how I had even forfeited the $60 discount that I would have had if I just make the regular purchase; that is some fine indemnity clause.

I read the terms and conditions on the certificate several times, and nowhere does it say that I cannot use it to purchase promotional items on Dell.com, and nowhere during the purchase was I warned that the certificate is invalid.

I’m an IT person, and I had pushed my institution to purchase Dell servers and workstations.  After three hours of getting nowhere, I lost faith that Dell can provide the service I have expected.  I plan to solve my problem by contacting American Express instead, and file a complaint with Better Business Bureau; I already called Dell to return the GPS.  Facts are on my side, I’m certain I’ll prevail.  I hope the readers will learn something from my frustrating experience.