Dell 3100 Laser printer suddenly 'offline'

Peripherals

Peripherals
Dell Monitors, Printers, Projectors, Hardware and Software discussion

Dell 3100 Laser printer suddenly 'offline'

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Suddenly, and without warning, my 3100 laser printer entered an 'offline' state and I can't seem to figure out why I can't get it back. It's networked to my system through a cat5 attached to my router. I've tried various things but no luck and am starting to wonder if the driver is mangled or the machine, itself, is broken. I did install a new widescreen monitor before this began but, for the life of me, can't figure out what could be the connection with that and my networked printer. Any thoughts?

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  • Well, this first thing I always ask myself when I don't know what's wrong, is...... what has changed?

    You added a monitor.

    • Could you have dislodged the network connection at the router or the printer?
    • Do the network activity lights on the network connector on the back of the  printer show any activity?
    • Has the printer been off for any period of time?
    • Have you printed a settings page to see if the printer still has an IP address that belongs to your network?
    • If yes, can you "ping" the printer?
    • Is the IP address the same IP as when you initially installed the drivers?

    "the Llynster"

    • CompTIA PDI+ Certified
    • all dell shop
    • internet connected via WildBlue satellite
  • Thanks for the input:

    After printing out a 'settings' page I noticed that the IP address was different. It has always been 192.168.0.6 but somehow changed to .5

    After that it was a simple thing to change the network settings in Vista. It's always a simple, goofy thing.

    Thanks again for reminding me of that 'settings' print-out because then it pointed out the obvious.

  • Glad to help..... was your printer off for any period of time? That may account for the reason it "acquired" a different IP.

    I might suggest you manually set the printer to a static IP that is outside the range of auto-assignments of your router. Usually, most routers only pass out a small portion of the available subnet, let's say 192.168.0.2 thru 192.168.0.50, or, 48 addresses. This range is usually adjustable using the routers web tool. If you manually set your printer to an address outside the range, for example, 192.168.0.200, you'll never have this problem again.

    "the Llynster"

    • CompTIA PDI+ Certified
    • all dell shop
    • internet connected via WildBlue satellite