DHCP messed up on my Studio 1737

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DHCP messed up on my Studio 1737

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So my Studio 1737 recently started slowing to a crawl when waking up or rebooting. It pretty much becomes non-functional for about 20 minutes. The (dual core) CPU is only running at about 20%, but everything is pretty much frozen. After much troubleshooting, I found that if I disable the DHCP service and reboot, the problem goes away, but (of course) I can't get online without DHCP. I have 2 other computers on my home LAN which are working fine, so I know it's not my router or my network. I'm running 64 bit Win7. I can't seem to find any way to 'update' or 'reinstall' my DHCP. I'm afraid mine might have become corrupted somehow.

Anybody have any ideas?

Thanks!

All Replies
  • DHCP does not get corrupted. Do you even know what it is and how it works???

    You have probably been infected with malware which hogs your system the second you are online.

    my Dells:
    Precision M6300 - Windows 7 / Ubuntu 12.04
    Latitude D620 - XP Pro SP3
    Precision M6300 - Windows 7

  • Wow, that was helpful.

    Do you think I could have tracked it down to the DHCP service without knowing what it is?

    Do you think I wouldn't try a virus/malware scan first?

    Or did you just miss the part where I said my CPU utilization was at 20%?

  • elfuzzilito

    Wow, that was helpful.

    Do you think I could have tracked it down to the DHCP service without knowing what it is?

    Do you think I wouldn't try a virus/malware scan first?

    Or did you just miss the part where I said my CPU utilization was at 20%?

     

    Since you know it all, there is not much you can learn here, is there?

     

     

    my Dells:
    Precision M6300 - Windows 7 / Ubuntu 12.04
    Latitude D620 - XP Pro SP3
    Precision M6300 - Windows 7

  • You don't say what operating system you're running.

    Linux dhcp client software is easily replaced by a different version.

    Windows' dhcp software is not. Unless the system has an old restore point that you can revert to, you'll most likely have to do a wipe and reinstall. This would take care of any malware infections while you're at it.

    You might try using a fixed network config instead of dhcp.

    Note that some kinds of malware (root kits) can hide on a running system. You have to boot the scanner from an external CD (like malwarebytes) to find them. Getting rid of them reliably takes a wipe and reinstall.

  • I'm running Win7 64 bit. Thanks for the helpful response.

  • You're welcome.

     

    I have a vague recollection of issues related to IPv6 and dhcp. You might want to consider disabling all of the network support features other than ipv4 to see if that helps. Of course, your computer may be using some of them to interact with the other systems on your local network, but this would just be for testing and you could turn the necessary ones on again afterward.

    I'm assuming you know how to get to the device properties for the network adapter (which is where ipv6 support is enabled/disabled), since you were writing about dhcp features. Oh, also make sure you've disabled all of the network adapters that you aren't actually using.

  • It's interesting you mention IPv6. On my home network one of the tune-up utilities (either Uniblue or TuneUp 2010 - can't remember which) suggested I disable the protocol to boost network performance. It didn't go into too much detail about why it thinks so but it did appear to provide some marginal boost. Nothing on the scale OP describes though.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Studio XPS 1645,  i7- 840QM 1.86GHz,  8GB 1333MHz DDR3,  500GB 7200RPM

    ATI Mobility Radeon HD5730,  1GB DDR3,  16" RGBLED Full HD (1920x1080)

    Windows 7 Pro 64-bit,  A09 BIOS

  • FINALLY got this fixed! 

    Had to modify the registry to repair DHCP.

    Instructions are here:

    http://www.ehow.com/how_4966595_repair-dhcp-windows.html

    Thanks.

  • Good that you fixed it and the link is interesting too.

    In the meantime I also refreshed my memory so, in case you'll need that too, the problem I saw in that area was with Teredo Tunnelling Pseudo-Protocol been disabled. This is used to tunnel IPv6 through services (NAT) that don't support it by encapsulating it inside IPv4 UDP datagrams. Best step-by-step instrictions I could find are here:

    http://forums.techarena.in/hardware-peripherals/892007.htm

    It's a bit old (Vista) but works fine under W7 too.

    Hope that helps.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Studio XPS 1645,  i7- 840QM 1.86GHz,  8GB 1333MHz DDR3,  500GB 7200RPM

    ATI Mobility Radeon HD5730,  1GB DDR3,  16" RGBLED Full HD (1920x1080)

    Windows 7 Pro 64-bit,  A09 BIOS