Dell Inspiron E1505 DST Short Test Fail: Error code 1000-0146

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Dell Inspiron E1505 DST Short Test Fail: Error code 1000-0146

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Hello,

I am new to the forum and am attempting to try and get my inspiron 1505 to function again.  I had an issue and believe a virus/worm etc may have infected my computer.  The computer was operating fine and I began receiving multiple popups indicating someone was attempting to access my computer and my anti virus indicated there were viruses on the computer as well.  I immediately powered down the computer.  I was able to power up the computer afterwards around 2 or 3 times and Windows XP opened but was running extremely slow.  Now when I attempt to power up, it goes through the boot screen and then the screen just goes black while the power is still on the computer.

From reading previous posts with this error, does that mean that my hard drive is toast?  The error message is 1000-0146 DST Log contains previous errors.  Then I rerun the test, and it comes up with error code 1000-0141 no hard drive detected.  Does anyone have any advice on where to go from here?  I recently purchased a new computer, but would like to at least get some of the files off the old computer transferred to the new computer.  Is there anyway this can be resolved, or am I out of luck on this one?

Would any reputable company be able to take the files off of this computer so I can place them on my new computer?  Any help, advice, pointers would be greatly appreciated!

All Replies
  • Yes, you'll need a 2.5" 9.5 mm SATA notebook drive to replace the faulty unit.  If the hard drive is not detected, chances are recovery other than by a recovery company won't work - and that can cost a couple of thousand dollars.

     

     

  • I would google "USB 2.5 3.5 SATA IDE adapter" and you should find multiple places to get adapters (for less than $20) that will connect your Inspiron's hard drive to another computer so you can try to get your data files off it. If you can't get them off like that, the data recovery companies really WILL charge you thousands to recover it for you - it's not cheap, easy OR fast... they might need to go as far as putting the platters in another drive. No small feat and still have it work long enough to get your data back (even in a positive-pressure clean room it's bound to let in *some* contamination - dust particles are HUGE in those clearances).

    Ensure the other computer has a good antivirus program running in 'auto-protect' mode and with up-to-date definition files so if your laptop's drive is infected you don't pass that condition on to the other computer.  Besides everything in C:\Documents and Settings\[user name]\My Documents\ for each [user name] you have on it, copy any folders you made yourself to which you saved files.

    Go to http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/systems/ins6400/  choose a language and get the Service Manual; unzip it and open INDEX.HTM in a browser.

    Should be 2 screws (#1 phillips head) holding in the hard drive 'tray' (really just a plastic handle on the end of the drive with a couple tabs that are screwed to the sides of the HDD) on the E1505/6400. Don't lose the screws... I stow them in small tupperware bowls with lids until reassembly time; your mileage may vary. The small side of the adapters that show up in that google search will plug directly onto the 2.5" SATA drive; the power to run the drive comes from the USB port, so either use a powered USB hub or ensure the other computer's power supply can handle the extra load (if it's a desktop there shouldn't be any problem).

    After you get your data files off it, put it back in the Inspiron, turn it on and use Ctrl+F11 as soon as the 'Press F2 for Setup' message disappears. That should start the Dell Utility to restore the factory image. Possibly you don't need to replace the drive. If the problem still exists after restoring the factory image, then you DO need a new hard drive. If that's the case you might as well get a 320GB to 500GB 2.5" SATA drive for it and do a fresh install of windows. If there's a hidden Media Direct partition on the old one it might cause you problems with cloning to a different size, anyway.

    Is that the kind of advice you had in mind?

  • The hard drive has a read failure.

     

    Replace the hard drive.

  • That's what ejn63 suggested on 02-26-2010.  All my answer from 02-27-2010 did was add details on how NewYorker9949 could do the swap themselves instead of sending the current hard drive to a data-recovery company.

  • My mom's laptop got hit by the same virus.  Lots of popups saying "your computer is going to die unless you get our antivirus software!!!" She entered her info including credit card.  On the next reboot, the laptop fails to boot past the initial post screen (hit F2 to enter setup).  PBR...4, !ATA...Done.  (or something close).  I'm guessing the virus over wrote the master boot record or something as nefarious.  I hope there isn't a way for software to thrash the hard drive in a way where it's a legit hardware failure.  In the middle of running dell symptom tree diagnostics on the hd.  All the pros on the forums say, "oh, it's a hard drive failure."  But, maybe it's just something software related the virus did.  SATA Disk S/N Read Test just threw: Uncorrectable data error or media is write protected.

  • You should tell her to call the credit card company and block any charges, then have the card company send her a different card (i.e. with a different number on it).

    Warn her about emails from Nigeria, and winning lotteries she never entered, too.

  • She's recently in the big world on her own.  She certainly learned this lesson about not trusting the internet the hard way.  ..and the messed up thing is that she did (at my sister's urging) report what happened to the bank.  The bank said they'd block all future charges from the company that charged for the fake anti-virus software.  But, seriously, if you're a bank and you hear about this, you need to insist to your client that they need to (as you mentioned, DarrDarr) completely cancel the card and get a new one.  Only blacklisting the original company, which is probably fake and that will probably be gone in two weeks?  Banks should know about internet scams by this point and that you need to cancel the card.  When I talked to her a few hours later, I got her to call back and completely cancel it.

    Working on the laptop now.  I got a couple of bios deep scan test failures for bad sectors on the hard drive, but those could have been old ones.  I don't know if the bios test is smart enough not to report sectors that have already been flagged as bad sometime in the past.  I got it booted into a WinXP recovery mode and can see pretty much all the files through the recovery dos prompt.  Running a chkdsk /r (recover bad sectors) which is taking a long time and then I'm going to try a FixBoot (fixes boot partition "sector 0" or some other root information, something a virus can apparently overwrite).  If that doesn't do it, I'll try a FixMBR (master boot record).  Although I worry because that can potentially make it so you can't access files on the hard drive if a virus is hanging out in the boot sector (according to some Microsoft articles).  I still have the option of pulling the laptop harddrive, putting it in an external case and pulling files off on another computer.  I'd feel like a heel if the FixMBR made all the files unaccessible.

    I had set her up with a cloud based backup service for her photos and whatnot, but the client software wasn't newb friendly enough (even though all the reviews said it was the most straight forward) and that didn't work out.  I kept asking her if she was keeping backups and she's actually been keeping old thumb drives and writing stuff to DVD.  Hopefully I can get these photos off of the virused laptop though so she doesn't have to copy them off a bunch of discs.

    Thanks for the advice.

  • Oh, and I don't see this anywhere on this forum thread.  Someone else mentioned elsewhere that if you can see your hard drive listed in your bios (F2 during the start of boot-up), there's still hope that you may be able to access the files through either the above suggested "put the hard drive in an external case" or through WinXP recovery mode.  If you can't see a hard drive listed in your bios, it might really be fried.

  • CardiffBubble

    I got a couple of bios deep scan test failures for bad sectors on the hard drive, but those could have been old ones.  I don't know if the bios test is smart enough not to report sectors that have already been flagged as bad sometime in the past.

    Only when the spare sectors allocated when a drive is commissioned are used up will bad sectors not be mapped out and made invisible...  so when you start SEEing bad sectors, it's time to replace the drive because their numbers will continue to grow.

      Running a chkdsk /r (recover bad sectors) which is taking a long time and then I'm going to try a FixBoot (fixes boot partition "sector 0" or some other root information, something a virus can apparently overwrite).  If that doesn't do it, I'll try a FixMBR (master boot record).

    You should use the MBR repair tool provided by Dell. Microsoft's FixBoot and FixMBR both break Dell's MBR if I recall correctly, then the restore partition and the MediaDirect button won't work anymore.

    If you don't have the laptop's Drivers & Utilities CD, I would recommend Goodell's DSRFix - http://www.goodells.net/dellrestore/fixes.shtml

  • I'm not sure why your message was deleted, CardiffBubble. The dual-core versions of the E1505/E1705 laptops can run Win7 just fine (I have 7 ultimate installed on the E1505 I'm typing on right now). You'll have to search these forums for suitable Notebook System Software, Chipset and other drivers, though, because win7 was never shipped on them.