Installing VLC Media Player voids your speaker warranty!

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Installing VLC Media Player voids your speaker warranty!

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Dell Tech Support is denying warranty service for speaker damage if the popular VLC Media Player is installed on a Dell laptop. Also we got a report that service was denied because a KMPlayer was installed on a laptop. The warranty remains valid on the other parts of the laptop.

Be aware that you can be denied warranty service on the speakers just by having the player, whether you use it or not. Suggest that all players be removed before contacting Tech Support, leaving only Windows Media Player.

VLC has a feature that can make the audio seem louder than other players. VLC achieves this by using a process that creates hard clipping (see below in this thread for explanation) which can damage small speakers. Dell has tested VLC and verified that the speakers can be damaged after several hours of using VLC. I believe that HP (Hewlett Packard) also says that VLC damage is not covered under its warranty.

If you choose to use the VLC player, it is suggested that you do not set the volume higher than 100% in order to avoid potential damage to the speakers. If you contact Tech Support about a speaker problem, it is suggested that you do not have the player installed.

If you have already been denied warranty service for a speaker problem only because you have the VLC player, please see the next post which is marked "Verified Answer". Send DELL - Terry B a private message. The way to do that is to click on his link, which is his name in blue letters. That will take you to his profile page where you can click on "send a private message" or "add as friend".

Jim Coates -- senior forum member


Verified Answer
  • Great Post Jimco

    If anyone was refused help by technical support when the only troubleshooting performed was finding VLC player installed please feel free to private message me. Just click on my portrait or the link in my signature and then click start conversation.  In your message please include your contact information, the service tag of the notebook and any case numbers that tech support may have offered. I will be happy to investigate further.

     

    <Further edit>

    For those of you that have asked for official Dell documentation on the subject please take a look at the following link.

    Issue with increased volume while using VLC media player 

    When using VLC media player, volume can be increased to max output. This eventually distorts the speaker output. If audio/video playback is continuously done using VLC with max volume (100%) over a period of time then even if the volume is kept at a lower level sound would be distorted. This distortion is permanent. 

    Why does this happen? 

    Some audio application like VLC player will allow large power output through speaker, approx 200% to 400% of original sound output. In this situation, excessive usage may damage the speaker. 

    What is the resolution? 

    If you are using VLC or any other amplification software, ensure that both the inbuilt audio output is set to 90% and output volume from amplification software is set to 95%

     

All Replies
  • Wow! Did not know that. You would think that companies would have a buffer to keep that from happening. They can dim a screen to protect your monitor, but no way to keep a speaker from blowing?! Not their fault. I am not throwing blame or anything. But that kind of stinks.

  • tippy1000
    You would think that companies would have a buffer to keep that from happening. They can dim a screen to protect your monitor, but no way to keep a speaker from blowing?

    Probably they don't blow. My guess is that they are burning out or having mechanical failure from the heat produced by unnaturally high average amplitude. I heard that one of the Dell laptop models got a BIOS revision to help protect the speakers from the VLC Player but I don't know how such protection could work except by lowering the overall volume.


    I played some short samples of a pop tune with VLC Player and simultaneously recorded them into a graphic audio editor, and made some screen shots of the amplitude waveforms -- just the left channel to keep it simple. These amplitude graphs represent the relative energy of the audio signal. The highest peaks represent the greatest amplitude, which increases as the waveform moves away from the center crossing line in either up or down direction. The center "zero crossing" line represents silence.


    Example 1 shows VLC playing the tune normally with its volume set at 100%.


    Example 2 is VLC Player playing the tune with the volume set to 200%.


    In both examples, the maximum amplitude of the signal is nearly as large as it can get, which is the saturation point of 0 dB (zero decibels). The 2nd example would sound louder because its average amplitude is greater. That is shown in the graph by the increased density of the waveform. A greater proportion of the signal is close to 0 dB.

    VLC can't make the laptop's amp produce more wattage than it was made to produce, so where does the increased volume come from? The program seems to increase the signal's amplitude to beyond the 0 dB limit -- super-saturation. That would definitely increase the volume  but the problem is that signal over 0 dB create very blatant digital distortion -- basically a loud noise. To fix that, all of the signal over 0 dB is simply chopped off, or clipped.

    Example 2 shows the increased average amplitude but with a form of distortion known as "clipping". It is called "clipping" because of the way the graph looks after parts of the signal have been hacked off. It is a form of distortion because the waveform has been ruined by hacking off parts of it. If you play a song with  VLC Player set to 200% volume you can easily hear the distortion in the audio signal.


    Here are very extreme close-ups of examples 1 & 2. The waveform in example 1 resembles a sine wave more or less.


    Example 2 is the same slice of music but with VLC Player's volume set to 200%. The maximum amplitude is the same as in example 1, but now there is much more of the signal near maximum so the average amplitude is much greater here. In example 1, the waveform was forming peaks near the maximum. In example 2 the waveform is creating plateaus near the the maximum, which means that it is now starting to look more like a square wave -- typical of hard clipping.


    The maker of VCL Player says there is nothing about the player that can cause damage to laptop speakers, and for all I know that may be true. Those guys are smarter than me. However these graphs demonstrate that the player creates hard clipping when the volume level is set to 200% and dramatically increases the average amplitude.

    The graphs actually under-represent the increase in the amount of average amplitude between example 1 and 2. That is because the graphs represent amplitude in decibels, which is a logarithmic scale. If the graphs accurately represented the increase in amplitude they would be too big to use. The bottom line is that there is a whole lot of extra energy for the speakers to have to convert into mechanical energy and heat without breaking down.

    Wikipedia has an explanation of why hard clipping can damage speakers in its article on audio clipping. It also mentions another problem with hard clipping that can destroy speakers, upper level harmonics, but that is probably not the main concern.


    Jim Coates -- senior forum member


  • Thanks for the info, Jim. Has anyone tried another DVD app that would be supported by Win8 and this Dell computer?

  • Sorry for the delay in replying -- been under the weather.

    The CyberLink PowerDVD that was included with the laptop should support 8 or should upgrade to a version that supports 8. You should be able to find the software for your laptop at My Dell Downloads.

    Jim Coates -- senior forum member


  • Great Post Jimco

    If anyone was refused help by technical support when the only troubleshooting performed was finding VLC player installed please feel free to private message me. Just click on my portrait or the link in my signature and then click start conversation.  In your message please include your contact information, the service tag of the notebook and any case numbers that tech support may have offered. I will be happy to investigate further.

     

    <Further edit>

    For those of you that have asked for official Dell documentation on the subject please take a look at the following link.

    Issue with increased volume while using VLC media player 

    When using VLC media player, volume can be increased to max output. This eventually distorts the speaker output. If audio/video playback is continuously done using VLC with max volume (100%) over a period of time then even if the volume is kept at a lower level sound would be distorted. This distortion is permanent. 

    Why does this happen? 

    Some audio application like VLC player will allow large power output through speaker, approx 200% to 400% of original sound output. In this situation, excessive usage may damage the speaker. 

    What is the resolution? 

    If you are using VLC or any other amplification software, ensure that both the inbuilt audio output is set to 90% and output volume from amplification software is set to 95%

     

  • Hello Jim,

    Are you a representative from Dell, if not can you please let us know do any person from dell has replied on such post?

  • MobinKhan
    Hello Jim, Are you a representative from Dell,

    Hello. I am 100% independent of the Dell company and do not represent it.

    MobinKhan
    if not can you please let us know do any person from dell has replied on such post?

    See the post above yours from Dell - Terry B. Terry B is a Dell liaison.

    Jim Coates -- senior forum member


  • MobinKhan

    I have replied to your original post

    en.community.dell.com/.../19493758.aspx

    I would check to see if the distorted sound is present regardless what player that you are using.  I also suggest testing with a head set or external speakers and see if you notice distorted sound then.

    TB

  • Running your new speakers at MAX volume right out of the box is bad for them. Just like any other item that has moving parts, you got to break them in... I have yet to hear anyone said that VLC broke their speakers on their laptop or desktop...

  • merci pour le  conseille

  • i wonder how warranty void if you install any software ? :O please some one explain it 

  • vimal
    i wonder how warranty void if you install any software ?

    Good question.  Looking at the Dell Limited Hardware Warranty it says that the warranty "covers defects in materials and workmanship". So if Dell sells a customer a laptop with non-defective speakers and the customer ruins the speakers by using software that pushes them beyond their parameters, I can see how that would not be covered under the warranty, because the failure is not caused by a defect but by the software.

    -- BUT --

    On the other hand we have received reports that tech support has been denying service for speakers if they do a scan and find the VLC player on the laptop, I don't see in the warranty where such a denial of service is explained. The warranty has a section entitled "What is not covered by this limited hardware warranty?". That section does not say that installing any software can cause partial loss of warranty. It is like there is both an official written warranty and a secret unwritten one that they only disclose to folks who call for service.

    [Note: if you were refused service by tech support when the only troubleshooting performed was finding VLC player installed, please go back through this thread and read the post from Terry_B that is marked "Verified Answer".]


    Edited by jimco  3-17-13

    Jim Coates -- senior forum member


  • Is the same thing to say MSI Afterburner broken the video card? Everybody knows that this software used incorrect form can break the video card.

    Oh wait!! The warranty take of care this.

    Dell Vostro 3550 - i5 - 2410M - AMD Radeon HD 7650M - 8GB DD3 RAM - 500GB 7200 RPM - Windows 7 Ultimate 64 Bit

    I can fly with this model.

  • Is nothing new.

    Installing any overclocking utility for example void many warranty - at CPU and GPU products.

    Installing a NOS system in your brand-new car will void also the warranty.

    Breaking nuts with a microscope will probably void the warranty.

    The manufactures don't have to cover any defects resulted by misuse of their products.

  • Cheers Jimco

    You have to wonder though when do people take heed of warnings such as volume capable of being set at over 100% and the orange to red indicator as a visual warning.  Speakers are always a hard thing to dispute when it comes down to what is covered under warranty.