What does Dell do with returned "crashed" hard drives?

Disk Drives

Disk Drives
Disk Drives (Floppy, USB, HDD, CD/DVD/BD) discussion

What does Dell do with returned "crashed" hard drives?

  • Dell sent a new hard drive under warranty because my original one "crashed". Dell wants me to return the crashed drive to avoid being charged for the new one. I understand this completely but wonder what Dell does with crashed hard drives to avoid compromising personal information that I'm sure still can be accessed if one knows how. Thanks in advance
  • texastacoma   
     
    Probably sold as salvage or "as-is" parts.
     
    It's your responsibility to make the information on the drive unrecoverable.
     
     
    Bev.
     
     
     
     
    ===================================================
    Please don't send me questions about your system by DCF Messenger.
    Post the issue in the appropriate Board, where they will be answered.

     

    If my answer was helpful, please use the 'Did this answer the question' and click: Yes
    Forum Member since 2001
    I am not employed by Dell

  • Thank you for responding. I am not a PC tech so how would I go about wiping my personal info if I can't access the drive?
  • You cannot, you must decide to keep the drive or return it, if you keep it, a hammer is the best way to destroy the data.
  • Thank you. I would like to send the drive back so I don't have to pay for the new one but do want to protect my personal info. I guess the only way to do that is to keep the old one and pay for the new one.
  • texastacoma

    If you have very personal data and information on the hard drive, then destroying the hard drive is probably the safest procedure.

    Bev.





    ===================================================
    Please don't send me questions about your system by DCF Messenger.
    Post the issue in the appropriate Board, where they will be answered.

     

    If my answer was helpful, please use the 'Did this answer the question' and click: Yes
    Forum Member since 2001
    I am not employed by Dell

  • Take a big speaker magnet to it. That worked on the old drives.
    I am not sure what Dell does but I have checked into what the drive manufacturers do. They do guarrentee that the data that may be on the drives will not get out. If at all possible they do wipe the disks and then remove the platters and destroy them and recycle the main casing only. I would like to think that Dell sends these drives back to the drive manufacturers and this is done. Maybe ChrisM can step in and give us some input as to Dell's policy on this.
    Dave

    Alienware Aurora R4: i7-3820, 8GB, 10TB of HDD, AMD/ATI Radeon HD 7800, Samsung 27" monitor

    XPS 730x: i7 920,   Replaced with an Alienware Aurora R4

    XPS 410: Core 2 Quad 2.4GHz (Q6600) , 6GB, EVGA 8800GTS 640MB,
    Single TV Tuner , X-Fi Xtreme Music, Logitec X530 Speakers

    Latitude 10 Tablet

    Inspiron 1720: T7500, 4GB, 120GBx5400, 120GBx7200, 8600GT, DVD+/-RW, Bluetooth,
    Windows 8.1

  • Speaker magnet will not work , it is a myth, well sort of. Some say these new large GB drives cannot be erased with any magnet, the magnet strong enough to erase these drives will bend the platters.
     
    "The only magnets powerful enough to scrub data from a drive platter are laboratory degaussers or those used by government agencies to wipe bits off media. "In the real world, people are not losing data from magnets," says Bill Rudock, a tech-support engineer with hard-drive maker Seagate. "In every disk," notes Rudock, "there's one heck of a magnet that swings the head."
     
     
     
    The real story about data destruction
     
  • I know, I love those magnets. I take old drives apart all the time at work to destroy the data and tos the platters in different dumpsters and keep the magnets.

    Alienware Aurora R4: i7-3820, 8GB, 10TB of HDD, AMD/ATI Radeon HD 7800, Samsung 27" monitor

    XPS 730x: i7 920,   Replaced with an Alienware Aurora R4

    XPS 410: Core 2 Quad 2.4GHz (Q6600) , 6GB, EVGA 8800GTS 640MB,
    Single TV Tuner , X-Fi Xtreme Music, Logitec X530 Speakers

    Latitude 10 Tablet

    Inspiron 1720: T7500, 4GB, 120GBx5400, 120GBx7200, 8600GT, DVD+/-RW, Bluetooth,
    Windows 8.1

  • dell returns the drives to the manufacturer - the manufacturer is supposed to wipe the drive. i doubt seriously anyone at seagate or wherever is going through the old drives that come in looking for credit card numbers....
  •  
    **********************************************************************************************************
    Seagate, Maxtor & Quantum's Policy
    Confidential data and Maxtor's data cleansing process on returned drives.
    If you returned a drive with sensitive or confidential information, and have concerns about the data being accessed after being returned, this will explain how the drives data is erased through Maxtor's test process.

    Answer

    BACKGROUND:

    Drives returned to Maxtor from end users may contain sensitive or confidential information. Maxtor recognizes our customers concerns about the security and privacy of any data remaining on a returned drive. Maxtor’s field return test process is designed to protect the customers privacy by completely eliminating any previously recorded data.

    PROCESS REQUIREMENTS & GOALS:

    The primary requirement is to securely and completely eliminate any data recorded on the returned drives. The process involved in fulfilling this requirement include: Automated test process (No PC based testing) Boot sector rewritten during initial testing, and Zero fill pattern and write verify on all functional returns. Failed drive teardown and rebuild involves automated re-process which also includes Zero fill pattern, and write verify.

    SUMMARY:

    Maxtor’s field return test and repair process provides automated drives testing that provides no opportunity for personnel to access customer data. During the automated process, functional drives are subjected to a zero fill, which writes a pattern of zero's to all surfaces of the media. This overwrites any previously recorded data, effectively eliminating previously recorded information.

    Alienware Aurora R4: i7-3820, 8GB, 10TB of HDD, AMD/ATI Radeon HD 7800, Samsung 27" monitor

    XPS 730x: i7 920,   Replaced with an Alienware Aurora R4

    XPS 410: Core 2 Quad 2.4GHz (Q6600) , 6GB, EVGA 8800GTS 640MB,
    Single TV Tuner , X-Fi Xtreme Music, Logitec X530 Speakers

    Latitude 10 Tablet

    Inspiron 1720: T7500, 4GB, 120GBx5400, 120GBx7200, 8600GT, DVD+/-RW, Bluetooth,
    Windows 8.1

  • "completely eliminate any data recorded on the returned drives"
     
    "Eliminate" does not mean destroyed beyond conventional recovery methods.
     
    "Zero fill pattern"
     
    zero fill would provide for one of the most recoverable scenerios.
     
    "Boot sector rewritten during initial testing"
     
    again very easy to recover from.
     
     
    If it is sensitive data, crush the drive.