Optiplex 760 SFF Power Supply EOL?

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Optiplex 760 SFF Power Supply EOL?

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After ordering a few power supplies(H235P-00) for some 760's I have, I got a message that Dell has no more of them and that they are EOL.

After searching around, I cannot find a compatible replacement part and cannot find any more information. I have over 40 of these PC's and it seems that the power supplies are at that age where they are close to failing. I have lost 3 in the past 2 months and I need to make a plan to keep these PC's running. Budget cuts are making it nearly impossible for me to purchase new hardware.

  • Does anyone have any insight into the status of this PSU?
  • Is there a compatible replacement that I can use that is not listed as compatible?
  • Does Dell plan to source this PSU out to 3rd party manufacturers so that we can get compatible PSU's in the future?
I's appreciate any help you could give.
-Kevin
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  • klisi

    I used Google and found the following:

    http://www.impactcomputers.com/h235p-00.html

    http://www.amazon.com/Supply-Optiplex-Factor-Systems-Numbers/dp/B00456S6YW

    http://www.thebestpartinc.com/h235p-00.html?gclid=CIDOlOXGyrcCFclDMgodmHIAOg

    Bev.

     

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  • Dell Part Number: WU136

    Model Number: H235E-00

    Compatible Dell Part Numbers: FR610, PW116, RM112, R224M, R225M, WU136, G185T, GPGDV

    Compatible Model Numberss: H235E-00, F235E-00, L235ES-00, H235P-00, AC235AS-00

    www.stuartconnections.com/.../1517-Dell-OptiPlex-380-760-780-960-SFF-235-Watt-Power-Supply-PSU-WU136-H235E00.html

    P/N: HP-D2352A0
    AC Input: 100-240V/ 4.5A, 50-60Hz
    DC Output:
    +5V 16A, +3.3V 5A, +12V 4A, +5VFP 4A, -12V 0.5A,
    +5V And +3.3V Shall Not Exceed 88W
    MAX Output Power: 235W
    Safety: UL, N, R32098, CCC S&E, RUV S&E, CE,
    Dimensions: 3.1 W x 2.4 H x 8.4 D - Inches
    Connectors:
    1x 24-Pin Mini ATX Power Connector
    1x 4-Pin ATX Power Connector
    1x SATA Power Connector
    1x Slimline SATA Power Connector

    Report Unresolved Customer Service Issues here:

    Dell - Unresolved Customer Service Issues

    I do not work for Dell. I too am a user.

    The forum is primarily user to user, with Dell employees moderating.

  • I saw many of these resellers but am very disappointed in the prices they are charging now that the product is EOL.

    The price I was paying, with my government discount, makes it almost foolish to buy these at retail.

    Short term I could get away with a few of these at retail price but I am more worried about the long term solution.

  • We have the same problem with the power supplies on 760s failing. We have been opening the power supplies & replacing 2 or 3 bad capacitors on the board. For a couple bucks you can fix them versus replace them. Please make sure you're careful if you go this route. There are some big caps on the board. Once you get the hang of it it's a $2, 20 minute job.

  • Thanks Speedstep...

    This is right inline with what I was looking for. This seems to be a compatible PSU with a decent price.

    The only problem is they only show 1 more in stock. Hopefully this will have greater availability in the future.

    And then I looked again and noticed that it is a used item.

  • Thanks FishBizkit!

    I did not think about going that route. I am not super skilled at electronics repair but I can run a soldering iron.

    You've given me a great solution and I thank you.

  • Hi,

    Is the only parts needing to be replace the big CAPS? What's the best way to discharge prior to replacing?

    Thanks,

    Murray

  • MSholind

    Hi,

    Is the only parts needing to be replace the big CAPS? What's the best way to discharge prior to replacing?

    Thanks,

    Murray

     MSholind

    Sorry, don't know what 'big CAPS' mean?

    To discharge the residue power, remove the power cord from the power supply and hold the power button in, for about 30 seconds.

    Bev.

     

     

     

    If my answer was helpful, please use the 'Did this answer the question' and click: Yes
    Forum Member since 2001
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  • Big Caps = Big Capacitors.  If not properly discharged they hold enough power to KILL YOU.Surprise

    This is why power supplies are not considered user serviceable parts.

    The most serious danger of a capacitor is that it stores electrical charge.

    Even if power to the computer has been turned off, the power supply capacitors may still retain enough charge to kill you. Since electrolytic capacitors are foil and fluid or paste-filled cans, pressure may build up inside the can and cause the capacitor to leak or burst. Electrolyte leaking from the capacitor is corrosive, causing skin irritation, damage to eyes or mucus tissues and damage to boards. If the explosive event happens when you do not have safety glasses on this can cause permanent blindness.

    Report Unresolved Customer Service Issues here:

    Dell - Unresolved Customer Service Issues

    I do not work for Dell. I too am a user.

    The forum is primarily user to user, with Dell employees moderating.

  • Unplugging the power supply is not a valid way to discharge a capacitor. Everything SpeedStep says is true, and servicing a power supply is not to be be taken lightly. Be sure to wear safety glasses, and be mindful that you need to be cautious when dealing with potentially "hot" electronics. We do this quite regularly, and with great success.

    If you notice in the photos the capacitors are all the smaller, "tootsie roll" size ones. Usually in the 6.3v 3300uF or 16v 1800uF area. Something relatively small. The unofficial way to discharge a SMALL capacitor is to take a screwdriver with an insulated rubberized handle and touch both contacts. If it's freshly unplugged it will likely spark a bit. Nothing to worry about. If it's been unplugged a couple days you may get nothing. Again, this is only for the little ones. The bigger ones need to be avoided and treated with extreme caution. You would have to pop it open, check what sizes and see if you can see any visually defective ones, remove then, get the sizes, and hope radio shack has them. If not amazon & ebay will. Then solder them back in & try powering it up. If it works, then you saved some loot. If not, you're only out a couple bucks, and some time, but still got some great experience for when you try the next one. I ruined one or 2 motherboards before I got the hang of it. But they were broke anyway, so no real loss.

    If you plan on attempting to repair your own PCs, which I fully endorse, I would suggest spending a couple dollars on a bit of equipment. Nice fine tip soldering iron with a replaceable tip, a solder sucker or solder wick, a magnifying glass that clips on your glasses or on a hands free stand. I have a small tackle box filled with goodies. The top lure divider works great for storing the multiple caps we use.

    Be smart, be cautious, and I think you'll be happy spending $2 to repair a mother board or power supply versus $40 or $60 or $80 to replace them.

    Good Luck!

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