Keyboard Failure on boot (DELL OPTIPLEX GX620 DESKTOP)

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Keyboard Failure on boot (DELL OPTIPLEX GX620 DESKTOP)

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I have a Dell Optiplex GX520 desktop and all it has is usb ports. Spontaniously the keyboard fails on startup.  I can't get to the Bios screen hitting F2 since the keyboard fails. I tried unplugging everything. Opening the PC and removing the batter and jumper but after insterting and connecting everything, it still does not work.  I even tried removing the ram chips but nothing I try seems to be working.  Any suggestions?

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  • Try the keyboard on a different USB port. Try a different keyboard. I doubt it is a problem with your BIOS or your RAM.

    my Dells:
    Precision M6300 - XP SP3 / Windows 7 / Ubuntu 12.04
    Latitude D620 - XP Pro SP3
    Precision M6300 - Windows 7

  • I tried the keyboard on a different machine and the keyboard works fine. I tried another keyboard on the dell and that failed as well.  I tried all the usb ports on the dell and they all fail.

    Note* When I plug the keyboard in the usb port, the Num Lock, Caps Lock and Scroll Lock lights on flash once as if it's getting power. Then no flashes and no function. 

  • I wonder if the usb connections are not holding the power.  If so, then maybe an external usb hub that is powered with an ac adapter, might do the trick. 

  • I tried a usb hub, and connecting the keyboard to the hub.  Doesn't work.  I tried getting a PS2 keyboard and connecting it to a ps2 to usb connector and plugging that in the computer.  Doesn't work.  Man, I'm stumped.

  • I know this is an old thread, but this happened to me and I actually found a solution that works. 

    My situation: Dell Optiplex GX620 mini tower. USB wireless keyboard and mouse stopped working - would get Keyboard Failure message on startup and then startup procedure would continue through to windows, but could not log in b/c no keyboard or mouse functionality. System functional, though b/c files on hard drives could be accessed via LAN.

    Basically, I believe I reset the CMOS.  Credit for solution to:

    http://www.techsupportforum.com/hardware-support/other-hardware-support/202090-keyboard-failure-boot-no-mouse-keyboard-functionality-2.html

     

    Procedure:

     

    - Unplug all devices, turn off/disconnect power

    - Press power button for 10 seconds to discharge all power

    - Open case (http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/systems/opgx620/en/ug/A02/mtcvrop0.htm#wp1051283)

    - Clear CMOS (http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/systems/opgx620/en/ug/A02/advfeat0.htm#wp1132466)

     

    In case anyone is like me (a software person, not a hardware person) - my biggest obstacle was not knowing what to look for, as I always thought "jumpers" were wires.  In this case, the jumper that you remove from the 2 PSWD pins is a small green piece of plastic that you move to the two pins labeled RTCRST (no underscore on my motherboard).  See diagram below. HTH.

     

     

  • I too have been researching this issue for quite some time now.

    In my GX-620, moving the green jumper from PWD to reset pins does clears the date/time and IDE settings, but I continue to get the frustrating messages "Keyboard  error" ...  "Press F1 to continue to F2 to senter Setup".

    And yes, I have tried several USB keyboards. Even bought a PCI card with PS2 sokets. No luck. :(

    Anyone else have a lead on a solution to this?

  • hi,

    I also had the same problem as you, and I had tried everything that you had tried but I finally got it solved.

     

    About the keyboard issue that I had. I finally got it solved.
    I was working on a friend's Dell Dimension E521 when I experienced the exact same problem---loss of keyboard and usb ports.
    I tried all the different ports that were suggested as a fix. None of that worked. Also this machine had no PS2 ports at all.
    This is a friend's computer. After thoroughly looking over her computer, I noticed that one of
    the front USB ports had a few bent pins. I thought to myself, perhaps that's got something to do with it.
    (maybe causing some grounding/shorting problem). So I straightened them out the best I could. Then I did the unconventional,
    unspeakable,unmentionable.......I removed the CMOS battery and turned the computer on (WITHOUT the CMOS battery installed).
    and VOILA!!!!!  I had a keyboard again. I really don't whether it was straightening out those pins or re-booting without
    the battery that actually did the trick but one of them  worked. I don't know if it will help anyone else but it worked for me. So, if you have no
    bent USB pins, you may want to try the boot-without-battery trick. (At your own risk)

  • I, too had the same problem and tried the same fixes, but I finally got it solved

    About the keyboard issue that I had. I finally got it solved.
    I was working on a friend's Dell Dimension E521 when I experienced the exact same problem---loss of keyboard and usb ports.
    I tried all the different ports that were suggested as a fix. None of that worked. Also this machine had no PS2 ports at all.
    This is a friend's computer. After thoroughly looking over her computer, I noticed that one of
    the front USB ports had a few bent pins. I thought to myself, perhaps that's got something to do with it.
    (maybe causing some grounding/shorting problem). So I straightened them out the best I could. Then I did the unconventional,
    unspeakable,unmentionable.......I removed the CMOS battery and turned the computer on (WITHOUT the CMOS battery installed).
    and VOILA!!!!!  I had a keyboard again. I really don't whether it was straightening out those pins or re-booting without
    the battery that actually did the trick but one of them  worked. I don't know if it will help anyone else but it worked for me. So, if you have no
    bent USB pins, you may want to try the boot-without-battery trick. (At your own risk)

  • I, too had the same problem and tried the same fixes, but I finally got it solved

    About the keyboard issue that I had. I finally got it solved.
    I was working on a friend's Dell Dimension E521 when I experienced the exact same problem---loss of keyboard and usb ports.
    I tried all the different ports that were suggested as a fix. None of that worked. Also this machine had no PS2 ports at all.
    This is a friend's computer. After thoroughly looking over her computer, I noticed that one of
    the front USB ports had a few bent pins. I thought to myself, perhaps that's got something to do with it.
    (maybe causing some grounding/shorting problem). So I straightened them out the best I could. Then I did the unconventional,
    unspeakable,unmentionable.......I removed the CMOS battery and turned the computer on (WITHOUT the CMOS battery installed).
    and VOILA!!!!!  I had a keyboard again. I really don't whether it was straightening out those pins or re-booting without
    the battery that actually did the trick but one of them  worked. I don't know if it will help anyone else but it worked for me. So, if you have no
    bent USB pins, you may want to try the boot-without-battery trick. (At your own risk)

  • I have the same doggone problem,, when the e521 boots up it gives me a "keyboard failure" error,

     

    I've moved the wired keyboard through all 3 Usb ports,, all I get is a "yellow" check when it boots up. I get the lights in front 2 and 3 that light up.

    I'll have to research what that means, but once I did get into the BIOs, trying the way described previously. Leaving the CMOS batter OUT..

    However, once there, I couldn't do anything because the keyboard was inactive/ failed .. so,, nada

    I put the CMOS battery back in and boot ed again and again,  from each USB port,, still got the "yellow" check mark from the keyboard with the

    "keyboard failure" on the screen.

     

    I've done the switch on the pswd pins to the reset pins,,, let it stay there 5 seconds and put it back on PSWD,, but nothing changed on the POST.

     

    Any more ideas?  Is it the motherboard? I have one to replace this one.

  •  
    lennyrose.
     
    If you wish to convert a PS2 keyboard to USB, an USB adaptor like THIS is required.
     
    Personally, I've found it costs less to buy a new keyboard.
       
    Bev.

     

    If my answer was helpful, please use the 'Did this answer the question' and click: Yes
    Forum Member since 2001
    I am not employed by Dell

  • How to restart my DELL I get the error message >> Keyboard Failure

    1)  POWER OFF for 20 seconds.

    2)  Unplug all USB connections while PC is powered OFF

    3) Wait 10 sec.

    4) Boot system and wait for WIN password Screen .

    5) Plug in USB connectors but, switch ports from previous connection.

    6) Wait for PC to declare new USB hardware found.There you go!

    7) Mouse should be working now... acknowledge each USB Device Found message.

    8) If something does not work, then disconnect  and plug into different USB port.

  • The 620 is one of the models that has PS2 option.

    If this board/cable is attached it will have an error if no ps2 keyboard is attached

    PS2 is on a header on the motherboard.  The adaptor is $20
    Serial PS2 Port Adapter for Dell OptiPlex GX620/GX520 Desktop and Mini-Tower Desktop Systems
    Part number: R4876 /  310-6685
    Dell Part# : 330-2493
     Manufacturer Part# : G257D

    This product is compatible with the following systems:
    OptiPlex GX280 (Desktop and Mini-Tower)
    OptiPlex GX520
    OptiPlex GX620 (Desktop, Mini-Tower and Small Form Factor)
    OptiPlex GX620 (Ultra Small Form Factor)
     
    ROHS compliant

    Report Unresolved Customer Service Issues here:

    Dell - Unresolved Customer Service Issues

    I do not work for Dell. I too am a user.

    The forum is primarily user to user, with Dell employees moderating.

  • Has anyone of the user posts suggested replacing the CMOS battery. Sounds like the the battery that holds the CMOS info is failing.  Taking out an old battery and putting it back in isn't going to solve an issue if the battery is dying. Should be a cheap fix if that is the problem.  Most of my expertise is in older hardware, but the issues are the same.  Back in the day, I remember having to send AA batteries to customers and dispatch hardware reps to sites because the user didn't have the know how back then to open the box and replace a AA battery for the CMOS.