Hibernate vs. Shutdown

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Hibernate vs. Shutdown

  • I have always just shut down my PC when I am finished using it and have never had any problems.  I just got a new Dell XPS 700 and given the sizeable investment, I am wondering if I should continue with the practice of shutting it down every time or hibernating.  I've never used the hibernate or standby feature.  Obviously I want to do whatever is best for the health of this PC. When I'm done with the PC it is usually off for a farily long amount of time, 10-12 hours.  I don't shut it down if I'm just going to be away from it for a short time, I just lock the internet when I do that.  Any feedback on this would be appreciated since this PC is now probably the most expensive thing in my house now!!!!
     
    Thanks
  • I have never used either one... Never.    Hibernate is mainly used for notebook computers to save battery life, and desktop systems using this hibernate have had a number of issues.  Some have had problems getting it back up from hibernate or stand-by while others have had no issues.   You really do not need this.  You can set the monitor to turn off after a given time, and when finished for the day, you can turn everything off.   My opinion only

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  • Bears hibernate...Computers get shut down.
     
    With the boot speeds of new computers, it seems kinda useless.


  • CCrusher wrote:
    Bears hibernate...Computers get shut down.
     
    With the boot speeds of new computers, it seems kinda useless.





    Are you & SR45 kidding me?


    I've been hibernating desktop systems since Windows ME and have NEVER had an issue on hundreds of desktop systems that I built.

    Also the boot time with hibernate is GREATLY reduced.

    Hibernate basically is the same as shutting down the system, but it stores a file on the HD that has all of the contents of the system memory stored at the same time.

    When you restart windows EVERYTHING that you were doing is back exactly where it was and is ready to work.

    When you boot the PC you have to wait for it to boot, and then you have to wait for the desktop to finish loading and all of your programs to launch.

    When you hibernate all of those programs don't really launch anymore as they're already loaded in memory from the word go.

    Give it a try fellahs and you'd be surprised.

    Also why do you feel qualified to give advice on something you've never used?

    Not trying to be a jerk, but me, I never give advice on something I've never done.
  • I just got my new DELL 410. Previously I had a Gateway. The Gateway did not handle power settings very well, so I always used Standby overnight to save energy. Now, I notice the Dell comes out of standby quite differently. It takes much longer. I tried the power settings, but preferred Standby. I've never used Hibernate, since I don't necessarily need to save what I am working on.

    Message Edited by hfhlt004 on 11-10-200602:23 PM

  • I've always shut down as well.  
    Even when Billy would insist it was better for the machine
    to use 'stand-by', I still preferred to shut down.
     
     
    As for 'qualifications'?, I believe (at least I interpreted) the Thread title was asking for 'opinions'.

    Message Edited by obey_gravity on 11-10-200605:06 AM

  • Morpheus Phreak   Yes, Morp, as I stated in my post, some have had issues with hibernate, and as I said in the same post, that others have not.  But, we get a bunch of members complaining about hibernat and stand by on this forum.  Mr. Gates, sometime ago, stated that hibernate was not actually meant for desktops, only notebooks to save the battery.  If you are one of the lucky ones, go for it.  If you are not one of the lucky ones, turn the darn thing off, and use the other methods.  :smileyvery-happy:

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    Windows 7 RC 7100

  • Generally speaking, do what works best for you. If you have a relatively short start menu, applications load fast and boot times are short I would shut down especially if, as you say, the computer has been on for 10-12 hrs at a time.
     
    If, on the other hand, you're like me - and your start menu is two pages long :-), boot times being long enough for me to go make and have a cup of coffee :-), then hibernation is probably a better option because restart is much faster than a clean reboot.
     
    It is true that some computers have issues with being able to go into hibernation, and, strangely enough, it is those that have more than 1 GB of RAM that have problems (counter-intuitive, isn't it?). That was the case for me (more than 50 % of the time the computer would not go into hibernation because of "insufficient resources") until the other day when I discovered that Microsoft released a hot fix for this problem in July of this year (yes, it took them that long, although the problem had been known for quite a while). After downloading and installing it all hibernation problems went away.
     
    That being said, at some point, periodically, it still is a good idea to do a complete reboot to release all the RAM that has been hijacked by programs and files you thought you had closed but are still purring in the background (or if you have memory leakers) ...
  • Well, if you have a RAID setup neither will work with the current XPS700 BIOS and nVidia drivers.  XPS700s with RAID straight from the factory fail.
  • Where did I say I never used it? Even with fast boot off, it takes 45 seconds to go from hitting the power button to looking at the desktop. If 45 seconds is to long to wait for something, then by all means hibernate , stand by , or chew your nails. My OPINION, not certified by any AUTHORITY other than my own, is that turning off is more stable and problem free.
     
    EDIT: clark_carty....is RAID not compatable with hibernate, or is it just the XPS700 and its BIOS?

    Message Edited by CCrusher on 11-10-200605:31 PM

  • :smileyvery-happy:  Like that one CC

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    VelociRaptor 10,000 rpm HD

    Windows 7 RC 7100

  • I leave my XPS 700 on all the time!
     
     


  • obey_gravity wrote:
    I've always shut down as well.  
    Even when Billy would insist it was better for the machine
    to use 'stand-by', I still preferred to shut down.
     
     
    As for 'qualifications'?, I believe (at least I interpreted) the Thread title was asking for 'opinions'.

    Message Edited by obey_gravity on 11-10-200605:06 AM






    Actually he asked for feedback.

    Feedback: The transmission of evaluative or corrective information about an action, event, or process to the original or controlling source

    Opinion: A belief stronger than impression and less strong than positive knowledge


    They are more than a little different in meaning.

    Also it's cute that you're following me in threads obey. I find it quite amusing.



    Just a general note to add here.

    Once again I've ran Hibernation on hundreds of systems over the years and have never had a single failure linked to hibernate itself.

    That being said if Dell is selling systems that cannot resume from hibernate then there is something to look at there very carefully.

    My XPS410 which is running RAID0 with drives from 2 seperate manufacturers resumes perfectly from hibernate on Vista RTM.

    So I don't know other than a possible BIOS issue or a bad drive why hibernate would fail.
  • I tried hibernate and it works with RAID 0 on my XPS600. I timed the two, hibernate versus power on/off. With fast boot off, and I use hardware profiles:
     
    Hibernate-55 sec.
     
    Power ON/OFF-67 sec.
     
    I wouldn't call it dramatic, but it is a wee bit faster :smileyvery-happy: 12 seconds


  • CCrusher wrote:
    I tried hibernate and it works with RAID 0 on my XPS600. I timed the two, hibernate versus power on/off. With fast boot off, and I use hardware profiles:
     
    Hibernate-55 sec.
     
    Power ON/OFF-67 sec.
     
    I wouldn't call it dramatic, but it is a wee bit faster :smileyvery-happy: 12 seconds





    With Vista the difference is even more dramatic. It's actually pretty amazing how fast Vista can resume.