Optiplex GX620 Problem (Fan speed)

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Optiplex GX620 Problem (Fan speed)

  • I've received several complaints by people concerning the Optiplex GX620 Fan speeds. I've analyzed the systems and it seems that bios has no controll over the fan speeds, so the fans spin out very fast and very loudly. I've had a similar problem with Optiplex 320, and I found out that the temperature controller in the front panel was faulty. The difference between the Optiplex 320 and GX620 is that Optiplex GX620 doesn't have the temperature controller embedded in the front panel, so I don't know whether it's the same case as Optiplex 320.
    Any ideas on what might be causing this problems and how do I resolve it.

     

    P.S. The strange thing about this is that I'm getting complaints from different people, so it might that the entire shipment or, in the worst case the entire series, could be faulty. 


    Thanks in advance!

    Message Edited by DrilonPotera on 07-11-2008 07:25 AM
  • We have had the same problem with some of our 520/620's. We had dell send us a new fan and they fixed the problem.

  • My company have this problem on a few of our 620s.

    I was able to solve it on 1 of them so far. what i did was:

     

    1. Replace the motherboard battery(it was empty)

    2. Update the bios

    3. Get rid of the dust inside the cabinet(making sure to get rid of the dust on the fans)

    4. Update the graphics card.

     

    Not sure what fixed it but so far i have no complaints on it after i did those things.

  • I was having the same problem after I installed a Zotac 8400GS graphics card. I went crazy looking for the problem - changed the fan, heat sink, CPU, power supply and battery without results. After reading your reply about the graphics card I uninstalled the card - problem was solved. The Zotac card runs way to hot for this system.

  • A fanless Radeon 5450 that only uses 20w of power may be the cure.

    Report Unresolved Customer Service Issues here
    I do not work for Dell. I too am a user.
    The forum is primarily user to user, with Dell employees moderating.

  • I've been using the internal board graphics - seems okay for my use. I still get noticeable  increased fan speed when the CPU is working hard ( Pentium D 3.2 GHz) but not even close to when I had the graphics card installed. I guess the GX620DT just has this problem.

  • A Pentium D should have the Copper heat pipe performance heatsink.

    The 620 FAQ Covers this.

    DELL OptiPlex GX620 - FAQ - Frequently Asked (and answered) Questions

     

    Report Unresolved Customer Service Issues here
    I do not work for Dell. I too am a user.
    The forum is primarily user to user, with Dell employees moderating.

  • This is a GX620 DESKTOP. I thought the copper heat pipe performance heat sink was available for mini towers only.

    I do have a copper piped heat sink ( which I believe is standard) in my GX620 desktop.

  • I have been using a GX620 for a few months and noticed the variations in fan speed. It gets noisy at times and I use my earphones to reduce this issue. I regularly remove the dust from the inside of the case, including the fans. A couple of days ago I turned to computer on to complete fan silence. The computer functioned normally, except no fan activity. I removed the cover and the case fan was not turning. I also noticed the power supply fan was not turning. It could be the power supply fan stopped function at an earlier time and I just did not notice it. I removed the power supply and removed the cover and removed the fan, I tested the fan with an external 12VDC power source and the fan worked normally, I installed the fan back in the power supply, put the cover back on, installed it, and turned the computer on and the fan still did not turn. The power supply provides +/- 12VDC to the motherboard, and the computer works normally. It is a mystery to me why the power supply is failing to provide 12VDC to its own cooling fan.     I have not yet had time to look in to the case fan being inoperative. All I know is that it is a 4 wire 12VDC fan with sensor and control wires that have to be connected to a temperature controller, I am not sure if the fan is bad or the temp controller. I am not sure where the temp controller is located. If anyone could point me in the right direction I would sure appreciate it. Thanks,

  • I don't know which size GX620 your using, but I had the same problem with my GX620 Mini tower ( the power supply fan stopped working). I replaced the power supply to fix it. I have all sizes of the GX620's and all of them increase fan speed at times especially when you first turn them on. Unfortunately, I believe, the heat senor control is part of the motherboard. I also, had to replace the motherboard in a GX620 DT due to the CPU fan control not working properly.

    Wish I had better news - hope this helps

  • I have a GX620 Small Form Factor. Going the way you did and replacing the motherboard and the power supply seems to be the expensive way to go. I already tested the power supply fan and and it tested good, so the problem with the power supply fan is internal to the power supply. I already have a 12VDC, 3.25 amp power module I can use to externally run 12VDC power to the power supply fan. This is more cost effective and probably much more reliable and cost effective than me purchasing a replacement power supply and have the same thing happen again a few months down the road. When the replacement case/cpu fan arrives, and if  the problem turns out to be a sensor/control motherboard problem. I can route 12VDC to the case/cpu fan from this same external power module.  This would also be more cost effective than purchasing a replacement motherboard and have the same problem happen again in a few months. I came across a youtube video showing how the air being blown across the cpu heat sink becoming extremely hot and then being forced across the top of thr motherboard causing capacitors to expand and fail. The suggestion was to turn the fan around and have the case/cpu fan blow the hot air out the front verses in across the top of the motherboard. This just makes common sense since the cpu heat sink does not care which way the air comes across it. I am also considering installing another 80 mm fan on the rear of the computer case blowing cool air inward to help the original case/cpu fan after I reverse it. I will mount this additional fan externally in the area of where the hard drive is located. I will let the air from this fan find its way around the components.  As many of us know, heat is the enemy of computers, and the less the better.  Thanks for your reply.

  • When I can get a 620 tower for $99 it does not seem worth my while to try modding 620 Desktop or USFF systems.

    For under $300 I have seen 745 755 760 towers with windows 7 and Core2 Duo.  At some point upgrading older netburst Prescott or Smithfield or Pressler Dual Core systems seems not worth it.    I have seen the 920 and 940 series for very little but not the 960's.

    Dell GX620 Tower, Incredibly Fast and Powerful Intel P4 LGA775 3.2GHz HT CPU (2MB Cache 800FSB), 2GB DDR2 Interlaced... 

    Keep in Mind that Windows 7 Pro is $149 OEM and $199 RetailCannot actually buy it anymore due to WIN8 being the only game in town now.  WIN8 Pro retail upgrade is $199 now.

    Windows 7 Professional Installed by a Microsoft Authorized Refurbisher Dell Optiplex 620 Tower, Fast and Powerful...

    Dell Optiplex 755 Tower Computer, Featuring Intel Insanely Fast and Powerful 2.13GHz Core2 Duo Processor (1066MHz...

    DELL OPTIPLEX 755 TOWER Dual Core 1.8GHz 80GB 1GB DVD±RW VISTA BUSINESS

    A Pentium D should have the Copper heat pipe performance heatsink.

    The 620 FAQ Covers this.

    DELL OptiPlex GX620 - FAQ - Frequently Asked (and answered) Questions


    Report Unresolved Customer Service Issues here
    I do not work for Dell. I too am a user.
    The forum is primarily user to user, with Dell employees moderating.

  • I want to provide a follow up to my fan issues. I noticed the case fan in my GX620 SFF stopped working. I lifted the cover to sett if anything was obviously lose, and there was not. After lifting the cover I noticed the the power supply fan was also inoperative. Jumping on the small power supply fan issue first, I removed the power supply, and removed the power supply fan.  The fan tested good. I did not feel like going in to the mini power supply, so I sliced the power supply fan wires to a small 12VDC power module and it functions off the same power stripe as the computer and monitor. I will leave it as is since I do not feel like messing with it. There were 2 potential reasons for the case fan not to function. One was the sensor/controller on the motherboard was bad, or the control transistor built in to the fan was bad. I ordered a replacement fan. The fan has a 5 pin connector that plugs in to the motherboard. Only 4 of the 5 pins are used. Of the 4 pins used the outer pins/wires and used for the sensor and control lines.  The centor 2 oins/wires are used to provide +/-12VDC to the fan motor. If you side the outer sensor and control pins out of the connector and plug it in to the motherboard, and power up the computer the fan will run at maximum tated speed continuously. There is a secondary issue with the GX620. I came across many websites showing swollen and blown motherboad capacitors caused by the case fan blown the hot CPU heatsink air across the top of the motherboard. Several people had suggestions on how to correct this problem. The one making the most common sense to me is just turning the case fan around so it blows the hot air across the heatsink and out the front. Requiring no parts or modifications, I reversed the fan and all seemed to work well With still having fan control issues the fan was running a max speed and, though noisy, the air coming out the front was just barely above room temperature, which should be keeping the CPU cool enough.  The replacement fan arrived and when I installed it, (reveresed) I found the fan to be the problem, and not the sensor/control circuit on the motherboard. I have now noticed when the case fan runs at a slower speed the air coming out the front is considerably hotter than old fan was running at max speed. I can now understand why this hot air would cause a problem flowing across the top of the motherboard. I suspct when the sensor indicates the temperature getting too warm it will increase fan speed as it did prior to the fan failing. This hotter air coming out from over the CPU heatsink makes me a bit concerned about the slower fan speed not cooling the CPU enough. Something is telling me "the cooler the better". I can always put the old uncontrolled fan back in to force more air across the CPU heatsink. Any opinons?

  • Being a new Dell user (refurbished Dell GX620 tower) I too noticed the odd fan speed conditions. Here is what I noticed. From a cold start the stock fan was turning slowly with little air flow toward the back of the case. I had not done anything to cause heating of the CPU or anything else. The computer was just sitting there idle. Of course internal processes were doing whatever they were designed for, but I had not touched the computer except to turn it on. Suddenly after about 20 minutes the fan went up a notch in speed, then another notch. At this point it sounded like an airplane taking off. The CPU monitor was showing about 40% usage and the chipset usage was up to 50% or more. The temperature near the CPU heat sink had gone up around 5 degrees, and the fan was spinning wildly. Quickly I removed the side panel and touched the CPU heat sink, and it was warm, not hot, but warm. Of course the fan was blowing warm air toward the back of the unit right across the caps. Having seen a gentleman on youtube that day explain his theory why high CPU temps may be causing said caps to fry on these Dell motherboards, it made perfect sense. Of course that did not explain why the fan speed was going from very low to very high for no apparent reason. It had to be programmed in the Dell program to raise the fan speed after being powered up for x number of minutes. That's my guess anyway. Here is my theory; if the CPU and chipset is working very hard naturally it's going to develop excessive heat. Blowing this excessively heated air toward and across the infamous caps is going to fry them. Simple logic! I turned my CPU fan around so it would blow hot air out of the front of the GX620, and this dropped the internal temperature an average of 10 degrees. With normal use the CPU and Chipset are up and down, and so are the temperatures. My next project is to install either a 80 x 80 mm fan on the back panel or 92 x 92 mm. I'm going to mount it so the outside air will be pulled in and blown toward the motherboard caps and CPU. This should cool the inside even more. It sure would be nice to figure a way to connect the back panel fan to run in tandem, speed wise with the CPU fan. Seems to me I saw a Y connector somewhere made to plug into the motherboard and use a different fan on each of the Y plugs. Heck if I could just find a 12 volt connection on the Dell motherboard or power supply I'd be happy. My old homebuilt computer (brand x) was loaded with 12 volt connections. I had 8 fans in it, and it's still working after 10 years! I'm just a lowly Tech school graduate, but I know enough not to blow hot air on to heat sensitive components. If I come up with a solution to cause the 2 fans to run at the same speed, whatever that may be, I'll post it.  

  • The CPU cooling fan has a heat sensor control. There are frequently programs running in the background, such as anti-virus, etc. that will cause the CPU to work harder and build more heat even if you do not touch anything. The primary issue is to turn the fan around so the hot air blows out the front and not across the motherboard. When adding an additional fan have it assist the CPU fan it pushing more hot air out the front. I have not owned a Dell Tower.  I suspect it has a typical ATX power supply?  If so, most computer do not use all the power supply output cable/connectors. There is always 12 volts available on one of those connectors. They have both +12 volts DC and -12 volts DC, so make sure you attach your fan to the correct one so it will turn in the correct direction as per the air flow arrow on the fan.